Home > C Words > continuity theory

continuity theory

Definition of Continuity Theory

(nounTheory asserting that middle-aged and older people adapt their lives to maintain the same activities, social relationships, and ways of thinking (e.g., beliefs, values) as they age.

Examples of Continuity Theory

  • An elderly individual continues to run for exercise but does so in a less strenuous manner.
  • Middle-aged people that stay in contact with friends from their childhood or university years.

Continuity Theory Pronunciation

Usage Notes

Related Video

Additional Information

Related Terms


Works Consulted

Griffiths, Heather, Nathan Keirns, Eric Strayer, Susan Cody-Rydzewski, Gail Scaramuzzo, Tommy Sadler, Sally Vyain, Jeff Bry, Faye Jones. 2016. Introduction to Sociology 2e. Houston, TX: OpenStax.

Henslin, James M. 2012. Sociology: A Down-to-Earth Approach. 10th ed. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Oxford University Press. (N.d.) Oxford Dictionaries. (https://www.oxforddictionaries.com/).

Shepard, Jon M. 2010. Sociology. 11th ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Wikipedia contributors. (N.d.) Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikimedia Foundation. (https://en.wikipedia.org/).

Cite the Definition of Continuity Theory

ASA – American Sociological Association (5th edition)

Bell, Kenton, ed. 2013. “continuity theory.” In Open Education Sociology Dictionary. Retrieved August 24, 2019 (https://sociologydictionary.org/continuity-theory/).

APA – American Psychological Association (6th edition)

continuity theory. (2013). In K. Bell (Ed.), Open education sociology dictionary. Retrieved from https://sociologydictionary.org/continuity-theory/

Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date – Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition)

Bell, Kenton, ed. 2013. “continuity theory.” In Open Education Sociology Dictionary. Accessed August 24, 2019. https://sociologydictionary.org/continuity-theory/.

MLA – Modern Language Association (7th edition)

“continuity theory.” Open Education Sociology Dictionary. Ed. Kenton Bell. 2013. Web. 24 Aug. 2019. <https://sociologydictionary.org/continuity-theory/>.